Goraidh - A Gaelic Language Tutor

Suas Leis a' Ghàidhlig!

Spring 2021

2021 Spring Quarter Course Offerings

2021 Spring Quarter

Course Offerings

Spring is around the corner and so there are new Gaelic opportunities both at Seattle Central College and offered personally by me.

Note: If you register for a class at Seattle Central College, please email me as the computer system changeover has occurred and I would like to check for you on their lists.

Courses offered personally:

Working with the IS Verb

Wednesday afternoons, 5 May - 23 June, 2:00 - 4:00 Pacific Time on Zoom; $200 paid via PayPal or Zelle

Working with the IS verb is an essential skill. It is challenging to switch between the IS verb and the BI verb, but there are also different flavors of IS verb constructions. This course will give you experience working with all the different flavors of IS verb constructions.

  • Session 1 & 2: Introduction and basic constructions using IS directly (including IS idioms)
  • Session 3 & 4: ’S e XY constructions (defining using definite nouns)
  • Session 5 & 6: ’S e constructions (defining using indefinite nouns)
  • Session 7 & 8: ’S e & ’S ann for emphasis

Flash card group

Wednesday mornings, 5 May - 23 June, 11:00 AM - 12:00 PM Pacific Time on Zoom; no charge

This informal group is for gathering together to talk about all aspects of making and sharing flashcards using an approximation of the system found in the book Fluent Forever by Gabriel Wyner. We will focus on using Anki, a free, cross platform system for using flashcards, but other systems may be explored if requested. We’ll also talk about using the International Phonetic Alphabet in Scottish Gaelic.
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Spring Quarter at Seattle Central College Continuing Education

For Spring Quarter at Seattle Central College Continuing Education, we have the following offerings:

Register here: https://learnatcentral.org/lifelong-learning/language-travel-classes/

Scottish Gaelic 3

**we need more people to register for this class in order to meet the minimum**

Monday evenings, 26 April - Jun 14; 6:30-8:30 PM Pacific Time on Zoom, No class on 31 May.

While this course is a continuation of Scottish Gaelic 1 and 2, anyone can register as long as you can work with the verb BI in the past, present, and future, and have an ability with nouns and the definite article.

  • Session 1: Working with nouns in the genitive case.
  • Session 2: Numbers and nouns, describing people and things
  • Session 3: Telling time, months, seasons, and holidays
  • Session 4: Conditional forms of BI and regular verbs
  • Session 5: Conditional forms of irregular verbs; adverbs of time, place, and manner
  • Session 6: Conjunctions and linking stuff together
  • Session 7: Using ’S ann for emphasis

History Courses

Note: I’m always tinkering with these and so this information is correct as of this writing.

Vikings in Scotland and Ireland (REVISED)

2 Wednesday evenings, 28 April & 5 May; 6:30-8:30 PM Pacific Time on Zoom

Vikings first raided Scotland in the year 793, attacking the holy island of Iona. The next year, they raided a church on Lambay Island near today’s Dublin. In this class, we’ll explore the Scandinavian expansion and its ramifications on the peoples of Scotland and Ireland. We’ll examine archaeological remains for evidence of lifestyle and see that the impacts of Norse settlement on these lands would change them forever.

Session 1: The Era of the Vikings
  • What do we mean by the term Viking?
  • Sources of information
  • Scandinavia before the Viking era
  • The Germanic migrations
  • Causes of the Viking era
  • Explorations east and west
  • An overview of culture, religion, and decorative arts

Session 2: Scotland & Ireland
  • Effects and evidence: Language and DNA
  • Scotland
  • The Northern Islands: Orkney & Shetland
  • The Old North: The Britons of Alt Clut & Strathclyde
  • The Mainland: The Picts
  • The Hebrides and Man: The Gall-Gàidheil
  • Ireland

The Gaels: History, Art, and Mythology (REVISED)

2 Wednesday evenings, 19 & 26 May; 6:30-8:30 PM Pacific Time on Zoom

In this class we will explore the history of the Gaelic speaking peoples and the effects of that history on their language and culture. Emphasis will be on Scotland and Ireland between the years 410 and 1603 CE.

Session 1: Roman Britain to the death of Somerled (c. 410 - 1165 CE)
  • Irish mythology as an origin story
  • The Saints and Irish monasticism
  • Early medieval ‘Celtic’ or Insular Art, illuminated manuscripts
  • The scene at the arrival of the Vikings
  • The Kingdom of the Isles v. the House of Dunkeld
  • The Norman Conquest (Vikings 2.0)

Session 2: Somerled to the Union of the Crowns (1165 - 1603 CE)
  • The Kingdom/Lordship of the Isles
  • The Lordship under Norway and Scotland
  • The end of the Lordship
  • Dùthchas, clans, and society
  • Galloglass
  • The Stewarts & Tutors
  • The Nine Years’ War
  • The Flight of the Earls

The Picts of Scotland (NEW)

1 Wednesday evening, 2 June; 6:30-8:30 PM Pacific Time on Zoom

Words like ‘mysterious’ are often used when describing the people called the Picts. We know them in the archaeological record from their hillforts and unique carved symbol stones. They appear in writings as victorious barbarians attacking Roman Britain or as victims of the Vikings. When Christianity took hold, they started carving elaborate Celtic crosses and making exquisite metalwork. What role did they play in creating medieval Scotland and why did they ‘mysteriously’ disappear?

Session 1: The Era of the Picts, c. 300 to 1000 CE
  • Define ‘the Picts’
  • Explore dePICTions of the Picts
  • What sources of information do we have regarding the picts
  • Identify Pictish symbol stones, Celtic crosses, and metalwork
  • Why they ‘disappeared’ from history
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Vikings in Scotland and Ireland (REVISED)

2 Wednesday evenings, 28 April & 5 May; 6:30-8:30 PM Pacific Time on Zoom

Vikings first raided Scotland in the year 793, attacking the holy island of Iona. The next year, they raided a church on Lambay Island near today’s Dublin. In this class, we’ll explore the Scandinavian expansion and its ramifications on the peoples of Scotland and Ireland. We’ll examine archaeological remains for evidence of lifestyle and see that the impacts of Norse settlement on these lands would change them forever.

Session 1: The Era of the Vikings
  • What do we mean by the term Viking?
  • Sources of information
  • Scandinavia before the Viking era
  • The Germanic migrations
  • Causes of the Viking era
  • Explorations east and west
  • An overview of culture, religion, and decorative arts

Session 2: Scotland & Ireland
  • Effects and evidence: Language and DNA
  • Scotland
  • The Northern Islands: Orkney & Shetland
  • The Old North: The Britons of Alt Clut & Strathclyde
  • The Mainland: The Picts
  • The Hebrides and Man: The Gall-Gàidheil
  • Ireland

The Gaels: History, Art, and Mythology (REVISED)

2 Wednesday evenings, 19 & 26 May; 6:30-8:30 PM Pacific Time on Zoom

In this class we will explore the history of the Gaelic speaking peoples and the effects of that history on their language and culture. Emphasis will be on Scotland and Ireland between the years 410 and 1603 CE.

Session 1: Roman Britain to the death of Somerled (c. 410 - 1165 CE)
  • Irish mythology as an origin story
  • The Saints and Irish monasticism
  • Early medieval ‘Celtic’ or Insular Art, illuminated manuscripts
  • The scene at the arrival of the Vikings
  • The Kingdom of the Isles v. the House of Dunkeld
  • The Norman Conquest (Vikings 2.0)

Session 2: Somerled to the Union of the Crowns (1165 - 1603 CE)
  • The Kingdom/Lordship of the Isles
  • The Lordship under Norway and Scotland
  • The end of the Lordship
  • Dùthchas, clans, and society
  • Galloglass
  • The Stewarts & Tutors
  • The Nine Years’ War
  • The Flight of the Earls

The Picts of Scotland (NEW)

1 Wednesday evening, 2 June; 6:30-8:30 PM Pacific Time on Zoom

Words like ‘mysterious’ are often used when describing the people called the Picts. We know them in the archaeological record from their hillforts and unique carved symbol stones. They appear in writings as victorious barbarians attacking Roman Britain or as victims of the Vikings. When Christianity took hold, they started carving elaborate Celtic crosses and making exquisite metalwork. What role did they play in creating medieval Scotland and why did they ‘mysteriously’ disappear?

Session 1: The Era of the Picts, c. 300 to 1000 CE
  • Define ‘the Picts’
  • Explore dePICTions of the Picts
  • What sources of information do we have regarding the picts
  • Identify Pictish symbol stones, Celtic crosses, and metalwork
  • Why they ‘disappeared’ from history
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Check back at the end of May for Summer 2021!